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Not your average dish: Miso spaghetti

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ANNABEL CHIA | STAFF

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JUNE 28, 2022

When I first saw a video on TikTok of someone using miso paste to make pasta, I was instantly intrigued. I typically use miso when I’m working with Japanese-inspired flavors — whether that be a bowl of miso soup or ramen. So, by adding miso to a cheesy dish like Italian pasta, I must admit that I was skeptical. The cultural fusion is distinct but definitely worth a try!

You may be asking, “How could the savory, fermented soybean flavor work well with the rich flavor of the parmesan cheese?” Believe it or not, it’s actually delicious! I can attest to its deliciousness for a fact because I decided to try it.

Like many of us, I used TikTok as my recipe book and started cooking! However, most recipes on this app used only four ingredients: parmesan, miso paste, butter and spaghetti noodles. What could possibly go wrong, right? Well, many things. It tasted like a an elevated version of buttered noodles, in my opinion. Although buttery noodles are great, I knew the savoriness of the umami could be taken even further with just a few more ingredients. 

I’m here to present my new adaptation of miso pasta! It’s so delicious that it’s difficult to articulate into words! 

Miso spaghetti 

Makes 3 servings

Ingredients

  • 10 oz of dry spaghetti (or preferred pasta shape) 
  • 2 tbsp miso paste
  • 4 tbsp butter 
  • 1 tbsp mirin 
  • 4 cloves garlic 
  • ½ cup parmesan cheese 
  • Truffle salt (for seasoning)
  • Furikake (for seasoning) 

Directions

  1. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add in dry spaghetti noodles to cook. Prepare until al dente (about 2 minutes before the package time). Save 1 cup of hot pasta water.  
  2. Add 3 tablespoons of butter and cook the garlic in the butter until golden brown.
  3. Add in mirin to the butter and garlic mixture. 
  4. Add the miso to the garlic butter and  toss the pasta into the mix. Then add in the reserved pasta water and the ½ cup of parmesan cheese. Mix well to avoid clumps. 
  5. The cheese, water, miso and butter should become a silk-like mixture. Add in the remaining tbsp of butter to ensure a smooth sauce. 
  6. The pasta is done! Season with black pepper and truffle salt (optional, but it greatly enhances the flavor!)
  7. Top off with furikake flakes, seared salmon or a plant-based alternative. 

And that’s all! The flavors in this dish definitely surprised me and are sure to surprise you too! This is definitely my new favorite pasta recipe because of how uniquely tasty it is.

Contact Annabel Chia at [email protected].
LAST UPDATED

JUNE 28, 2022


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